British Wool has announced the purchase of new premises in Selkirk, which will replace its current depot in Galashiels in the Scottish borders from the 2023 wool season.

The new site provides a more modern and spacious working environment, with increased capacity for wool grading and storage, providing more flexibility for the business and improved service to members.

This development comes on the back of the sale of the Irvine site in 2021 and enables British Wool to optimise wool collection and processing costs in the region.

For local members delivering wool this season the arrangements will remain the same and there will continue to be no deductions for transport for wool delivered to an approved British Wool collection site.

Commenting on the development, Jim Roberston, farmer director and British Wool chairman, said:

“Since our restructure in 2021, our Galashiels depot has been handling an increased volume of wool, grading all the wool from Southern Scotland and parts of Northumberland.

"The existing premises have served British Wool and our members well, but the time is right to modernise our depot operation in the area, investing in the future of wool grading in the Scottish Borders.

“As a farmer marketing organisation, everything we do is about adding value to British wool to maximise the returns to our farmer members.

"The proceeds from the sale of our premises in Galashiels, along with those from the sale of the Irvine site in 2021, will be reinvested in the business to help us continue to drive operating efficiency.”

Billy Hewitson, head of operations at British Wool, added:

“For the remainder of the 2022 wool season, local members should continue to deliver wool to our Galashiels depot.

"For members in the Irvine area, although we have sold our Intermediate Depot premises there, we have also retained some of the building for accepting wool and continuing our service to members in that area.

“We will communicate to members in the region when the new Selkirk depot opens for the 2023 wool season, to explain the changes to wool collection arrangements in the area.”