Current technologies cannot deliver half of 2050 carbon emissions reduction goal

An independent report assessing the carbon intensity of all UK livestock production systems has identified that currently available technologies cannot deliver even half the industry’s 2050 carbon emissions reduction goal.

The report was commissioned by CIEL (Centre for Innovation Excellence in Livestock), written by environmental, climate and livestock scientists from eight renowned UK research institutions and endorsed by a further six.

The ‘Net Zero Carbon & UK Livestock Report’ will be used to inform the debate about climate change and the role livestock can play to reduce emissions that contribute to global warming.

“The report represents a widely agreed summary of the current research available on greenhouse gas emissions from the main farmed livestock species in the UK,” says Lyndsay Chapman, CIEL chief executive.

“It included interpretation and a number of recommendations from leading livestock, environmental and climate scientists.

We wanted the report to review current knowledge and identify areas where there are gaps in our ability to measure or achieve the target reductions in emissions set for UK agriculture.

“We also wanted to provide benchmarks for the carbon footprint of farmed livestock, hotspots where the greatest emissions occur and where there are opportunities to focus future efforts to reduce emissions.”

The need for innovation

Lead scientist, Professor Bob Rees, from Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC), stressed the need for new innovations to further reduce emissions beyond the levels that currently known mitigation strategies will deliver.

The report has identified that even if all known methods for mitigation of carbon emissions were taken up rapidly, the industry could only deliver 19% of the aspirational carbon reduction target by 2035, highlighting the urgent need to advance technologies and develop new innovations to address this critical issue.

“Livestock farming is an integral part of UK agriculture, our landscape and food systems, but it’s a complex system involving flows of carbon, nitrogen, water and atmospheric gases.

“In order to help balance the reduction in emissions with the production of high-quality nutritious food, a combination of strategies is needed.

“These must consider all dimensions of sustainable agriculture including carbon efficiency, soil health, animal health and welfare, and much more.

“And for that we need more innovation, collaboration and widespread adoption,” he concluded.